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Collegiality enhances university leadership in a post-Covid world

Jonathan Baldwin, managing director of higher education at Jisc, looks at the changing role of post-Covid university leadership and the enduring need for collaboration.

Moving the HE landscape’s quality contours … again

The government's announcement of a major review of the National Student Survey signals a worrying shift in the HE regulatory landscape, warns Jon Scott, higher education consultant and former Pro Vice-Chancellor (student experience) at the University of Leicester.

Government plans mark a seismic shift in higher education policy

Statements from ministers this week have made it clear that higher education in England is facing significant reforms, re-setting its focus towards helping to plug the UK's skills gaps and rebuilding the economy. Fariba Soetan, Policy Lead for Research and Innovation at the National Centre for Universities and Business, argues that the proposed changes bring a welcome focus on graduate outcomes and supporting the careers of young people.

UK universities affirm 'deep commitment' to high quality TNE

Universities UK and GuildHE have commissioned the Quality Assurance Agency to develop a new approach to reviewing and enhancing the quality of UK TNE. QAA will consult on a new review method later this year and will launch a programme of in-country enhancement activity in 2021.

Cassandra calling out higher education

After a week of largely disappointing news for UK higher education, Nicola Owen, Deputy Chief Executive (Operations) at Lancaster University, fears that gloomy forecasts for the future of the sector may prove to be uncomfortably accurate.

Writing off graduate debt would cost £80bn less than claimed, but only high earners would gain, says IFS

The long term cost of writing off graduate debt would be up to £80 billion lower than some politicians and commentators have claimed, an analysis by the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

The IFS dismissed suggestions that government debt would rise by £100 billion if it wrote off loans taken out by graduates who paid £9,000 a year tuition fees. The actual cost would be only around £20 billion if action was taken immediately, rising to £60 billion if the policy was pursued after an election in 2022, it said.

However, a paper on the analysis adds that writing off loans would still weaken public finances, and would also largely benefit high-earning graduates, with low earners standing to gain very little.

The analysis follows a debate on the cost of cancelling graduate debt after Labour pledged to scrap tuition fees and its leader Jeremy Corbyn suggested his party would also like to be able to “deal with” the debt burden of those with “the historical misfortune of being at university during the £9,000 period”

Shortly after Labour’s manifesto promise the IFS stated that scrapping fees for new students would increase public borrowing by £11 billion a year.

The new analysis says writing off post-2012 fee loans would bring about a one-off increase in the government’s deficit of £34 billion, but beyond that it would be increased only by the loss of interest that would otherwise have been accrued on the outstanding debt.

“Depending on how the write-off is scored it is possible that the deficit would actually be reduced in future years as less debt will be written off in those years. But of course this would all be dwarfed by the £11 billion a year cost if loans were replaced by “free” tuition going forward,” the paper adds.

The IFS also adds that cancelling graduate debt could leave those who did not borrow the full amount available and the 7 per cent of students starting in 2014-15 who chose to pay fees upfront feeling cheated.

Source: IFS
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