Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
New year presents HE sector with fresh challenges

Professor Malcolm Todd, Deputy Vice-Chancellor/Provost (academic and student experience) at the University of Derby, comments on what he sees as the most significant higher education news and opinions making headlines in the first week of 2020.

Universities UK International calls on employers to back study abroad campaign

Vivienne Stern, Director of Universities UK International, introduces the launch of Year Three of UUKi's Go International: Stand Out campaign, calling on employers to promote the value of international experience.

University leaders commit to pension talks as strikes begin

University leaders have written to the University and College Union to formally outline their commitment to continuing to work with UCU to deliver long-term reform of the Universities Superannuation Scheme. The move comes as UCU members at 60 universities begin strike action in disputes over both pensions and pay.

Gateway to university expertise now provides 'smart match' with business

A platform providing a single access point for businesses to university expertise and funding opportunities has been further developed by the National Centre for Universities and Business, Research England, and UK Research and Innovation, to help 'smart match' business and industry with higher education institutions, in a bid to boost R&D collaboration. Shivaun Meehan, Head of Communications at the NCUB, outlines the latest features of Konfer.

Which? finds one in five universities breaching consumer law

One in five universities is breaching consumer law with small print that allows it to make last minute changes to courses, new research suggests.

The Which? University investigation found widespread use of policies which allowed institutions to alter courses, even when students had already enrolled, in a range of circumstances. Other policies lacked detail or were too confusing for students to understand.

The report is based on responses to a Freedom of Information request by Which?, asking universities for their rules on course alterations and cancellations.

It found that 20 per cent of universities applied policies that were “unlawful”, usually by retaining absolute discretion to vary courses at the eleventh hour as they see fit. A further 31 per cent had policies that were likely to breach consumer protection law.

Just 5 per cent of universities had rules which were considered to be “good practise”. Only one – York University – had an approach which positively protected the rights of students by consulting on changes and requiring unanimous consent from those affected.

Some 37 per cent of the 131 universities that responded did not provide enough information for the consumer website to check if the rules on changes were fair, suggesting students would be unlikely to be able to work out where they stand.

The Which? investigation follows research published in a report by the consumer website in November. It found that six in ten students had experienced a change of some kind to their course. Of these, more than a quarter felt at least one of the changes had a significant impact on them and a third felt the changes were unfair.

The findings of the two reports will be submitted to the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) which recently published draft guidance on how consumer law applies to universities, including what they needed to do to ensure terms are transparent and fair.

Richard Lloyd, the executive director of Which?, said all providers should ensure their terms are complying with the law and should use a standard, consumer-friendly format for student contracts.

He said: “It’s worrying to see such widespread use of unfair terms in university contracts. Students deserve to know what they can expect from a course before signing up so that they can be confident they will get what they pay for.

“With tuition fees higher than ever before, we want universities to take immediate action to give students the protection they’re entitled to.”

Responding to the report, Nicola Dandridge, Chief Executive of Universities UK, said:

“The most recent National Student Survey (NSS) results show that student satisfaction is at a record high. Universities UK is engaging with the Consumer and Markets Authority (CMA) on its draft guidance to higher education institutions, and when the final version is published we will support members to ensure that they are compliant with it.

“Universities frequently offer modules related to the research expertise of particular members of staff. This is an important part of what is unique about the university experience, but does mean that modules offered may sometimes be subject to change. Universities need to clearly state to potential students when this is the case to allow them to make informed decisions.”



 

olivierl / 123RF
Back