Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
HEi-know Good Practice Briefing: UK universities describe "amazing" shift to online delivery

Universities across the UK have rapidly moved their learning, teaching and assessment online in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The unprecedented overhaul of traditional teaching practices has presented a major challenge to institutions, staff and students. In this Good Practice Briefing, HEi-know shows how some universities have responded to the situation.

World events highlight stark inequalities in HE

Sutton Trust associate director of media and communications Hilary Cornwell and research and policy assistant Maariyah Dawood comment on equality and widening access issues that have emerged in a week of higher education news.

Government and employers must match HE’s positive moves on equality

Reviewing a week of higher education news, Action on Access Director Andrew Rawson celebrates positive action on equality and social inclusivity taken in the HE sector and calls for matching support from the government and employers.

Removal of statues is “censoring the past”, warns universities minister

The universities minister has strongly criticised the renaming of university buildings and the removal of statues prompted by the Black Lives Matter movement as “short sighted” and an attempt to censor the past.

Unite students publishes report on student resilience

Unite Students has published what it describes as the "first in-depth UK report on student resilience". Authored by Dr Emily McIntosh from the University of Bolton and Jenny Shaw from Unite Students, the report draws on a large survey dataset and an extensive literature review to provide a fresh definition of resilience.

The report makes a positive case for resilience, shining a light on, and proposing a way forward for, what has become something of a debate within the sector. Some of the key findings include:

 ·         There is a growing issue of student mental ill-health:

This research reinforces the view that there is a growing issue with student mental health, isolation and stress.

·         Resilience is tangible:

Resilience can be defined and is influenced by both internal and external factors, with students’ social environment having a significant role to play.

·         Resilience is linked to satisfaction:

Higher resilience is associated with higher life satisfaction.

·         Resilience can be developed:

Individual resilience isn’t fixed; it can be developed - through innovative pedagogies and students’ social and living environment.

·         Greater understanding is required:

The evidence is that a better understanding of resilience could have a significant impact on improving outcomes for both students and universities.

·         Cultural exclusion:

Students from socio-economic groups D and E have similar ‘internal resilience’, but score lower on social factors, suggesting that the culture of university can be less welcoming to students from a working class background.

·         Peer support:

Peer support, including flatmates or housemates, can play an important role in resilience.

The report also sets out an academic case for resilience, arguing that it embodies the traditional values and mission of higher education: to nurture strong, independent learners and to support the development of rounded individuals that can contribute positively to society.

However, the authors argue that there is ambiguity associated with the word resilience. This has been, in part, due to a lack of qualitative and quantitative data assessing its impact and how it can be used and applied to the overall student experience, particularly in relation to student support, retention and success. 

This is addressed by:

1.     Reviewing the existing literature on student resilience;

2.     Presenting new insights based on a quantitative dataset collected for the Unite Students Insight Report in 2016; and

3.     Shedding light on the ambiguity of the term resilience by offering a more concrete definition of its significance and application in the area of student experience. 

Resilience addresses mental wellbeing across the whole student population and potentially offers the key to useful strategies and interventions. It is rooted in positive thinking, is developmental, avoids labelling and is empowering for students.

Mainstreaming resilience approaches within higher education offers opportunities to improve student outcomes, to nurture independent learners and ultimately to empower a whole generation with valuable skills for uncertain times.

The Student Resilience report can be downloaded from www.unite-group.co.uk/studentresilience You can follow the conversation on twitter using the hashtag #studentresilience

 

Back