Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
Graduate earnings and HE admissions data mark another Groundhog Week in HE

Charlie Ball, Head of Higher Education Intelligence for Prospects at Jisc, reviews a week of higher education news which felt much like every other since lockdown, as new research on graduate earnings and university admissions was published.

Universities and students grapple with Covid and Brexit-related issues

Stephen Isherwood, chief executive of the Institute of Students Employers, reviews a week of HE news in which student accommodation, fee refunds, graduate jobs, and research funding surfaced as key issues.

Pandemic highlights gender inequality in HE

Reviewing a week in which issues affecting women’s lives were in the spotlight, Sandra Booth, Director of Policy and External Relations at the Council for Higher Education Art and Design (CHEAD), sees hopeful signs of moves to address gender equality in higher education.

Disadvantaged students and graduates need even more help in a pandemic

Commenting on a week of higher education news, Alice Gent, Policy, Research and Communications Intern, and Ruby Nightingale, Communications and Public Affairs Manager at the Sutton Trust, highlight evidence that Covid-19 is having a disproportionate impact on students and graduates from poorer backgrounds.

Fog starts to clear on road ahead for HE

Rachel Hewitt, Director of Policy and Advocacy for the Higher Education Policy Institute, sees signs of a clearer route out of the Covid crisis beginning to emerge for higher education.

Public positive about universities but question graduate work skills and value for money

A national poll of the public on their perceptions of universities has produced mixed results.

Research commissioned by Universities UK shows that when asked if they felt positively or negatively about British universities, nearly half of people said they were positive, with more than 30 per cent responding that they were neutral.

But the survey of more than 2,000 adults conducted by BritainThinks also shows that most people do not feel universities equip graduates with sufficient workplace skills, and half question whether investment in studying for a degree represents good value for money.

The poll and accompanying workshops held in eight locations across the country revealed that most people view universities as “irrelevant” to their lives and many think they have at best a neutral impact on their local community.

Over half of respondents (58 per cent) felt the higher education sector had a positive impact on the UK as a whole and the majority were aware that UK universities were globally recognised for their outstanding research. Research was seen as the single biggest benefit of universities.

Young people were generally more positive about higher education than those aged 65 plus and were more likely to disagree with the statement that degrees do not equip graduates with employability skills.

However, overall nearly 60 per cent of those polled felt that universities did not equip graduates with the skills they need to be successful in the workplace and almost half felt that the expense of going to university outweighed the benefits of doing so.

There was also a lack of appreciation of the impact of universities locally, with 50 per cent of respondents saying institutions had a negative or neutral effect on their local community.

Perception of UK universities was broadly similar across the devolved nations. In general, the Scottish were slightly more engaged, better informed and more positive towards universities.

The research concluded that there was a real opportunity to build pride in, and support for, the UK’s universities and that risks were associated with not building a positive counter-balancing narrative.

Nick Hillman, the director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, said that among the positive responses, there were some thought-provoking challenges.

“Universities directly and indirectly touch most people’s lives but that isn’t always as clear as it should be,” he said. “My answer to that would be to look closely at what some of our newer, more locally-rooted institutions are doing and to learn from them. We may also, in the long run, want to stop the pretence that all universities can be world class in absolutely everything they do. Our institutions strive to be excellent at an international, national and regional level because that is what policymakers expect of them, but it is exceedingly hard to tick all three boxes simultaneously in the absence of limitless resources.”

Professor Dame Janet Beer, President of Universities UK and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Liverpool, said: “There is a myth that the public are sceptical about the merits of universities – and that an increasingly large number of young people think higher education is a waste of time. In fact, as this research shows, the opposite is true. The public are hugely positive towards universities and see the benefits of a university education.”

  

Back