Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
Moving the HE landscape’s quality contours … again

The government's announcement of a major review of the National Student Survey signals a worrying shift in the HE regulatory landscape, warns Jon Scott, higher education consultant and former Pro Vice-Chancellor (student experience) at the University of Leicester.

Government plans mark a seismic shift in higher education policy

Statements from ministers this week have made it clear that higher education in England is facing significant reforms, re-setting its focus towards helping to plug the UK's skills gaps and rebuilding the economy. Fariba Soetan, Policy Lead for Research and Innovation at the National Centre for Universities and Business, argues that the proposed changes bring a welcome focus on graduate outcomes and supporting the careers of young people.

UK universities affirm 'deep commitment' to high quality TNE

Universities UK and GuildHE have commissioned the Quality Assurance Agency to develop a new approach to reviewing and enhancing the quality of UK TNE. QAA will consult on a new review method later this year and will launch a programme of in-country enhancement activity in 2021.

Cassandra calling out higher education

After a week of largely disappointing news for UK higher education, Nicola Owen, Deputy Chief Executive (Operations) at Lancaster University, fears that gloomy forecasts for the future of the sector may prove to be uncomfortably accurate.

Whatuni award winners announced

Loughborough University has been named University of the Year for the second time in three years in the latest Whatuni Student Choice Awards .

New norms highlight the value of scientific experts and research collaboration

The current crisis has underlined the critical role played by the UK’s experts and researchers and the institutions supporting them, as well as the need for collaboration between them, says Dr Joe Marshall, Chief Executive of the National Centre for Universities and Business.

 

As governments, international agencies, global corporations and institutions grappled to keep pace with the spread of Covid19, it is the scientific community that has provided us with guidance, evidence and grounded recommendations.  In circumstances that would not have seemed possible just a few days ago, the Chief Scientific Adviser and Chief Medical Officer have stood tall, citing the best evidence they have and seeking to be both reassuring and stark in their assessment of the risks and challenges that lie ahead.  Now, we all need to adapt temporarily to a different way of living our lives, of working and of learning.

As many who have worked in central Government will testify, the pace is frenetic at the best of times. In a time of crisis, it becomes a mind-blowing blur powered by adrenaline, caffeine and nervous energy.  In a cauldron of political interference, public perceptions and media interpretation, the Government has sought to stand behind the scientific evidence. In such a dynamic environment it is difficult to make any assessment of the efficacy of the decision making (especially at this point).  But through different channels and at different times there has been a willingness to open up the scientific workings to wider scrutiny. 

The actions of governments will be critical to save lives, but so too are the actions of educational institutions, researchers and individuals. Many institutions have had to respond to the evolving crisis with unprecedented measures at an unprecedented pace. All face-to-face teaching will temporarily cease and switch to online learning; facilities and services are closing or changing; and many staff are working from home. This week, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson confirmed that many university entrants next year will start without having taken their final exams. Institutions are temporarily operating in an entirely new environment.

Without doubt, those institutions training medical professionals have a particularly acute role to play. UK medical schools have been urged to fast-track qualifications for final-year medical students to enable them to be quickly registered as doctors to help tackle the coronavirus outbreak. Thought is being given as to how 18,000 nursing students could be drafted in to help at the peak of crisis. Once-competitive institutions have been sharing innovative ideas and approaches on ways to help fight Covid19. They are driven by the clarity of a shared and immediate purpose: saving lives and livelihoods.

The much-cited soundbites that the UK “punches above its weight” in terms of research excellence was illustrated beautifully this week. A publication from the World Health Organisation’s Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling, which is based at Imperial College London, underpins much of the Government’s thinking on how we best manage and mitigate the impacts of the Covid19. The recommendations it offers are driven by evidence and modelling, but also take account of the context and concerns that policymakers have.  This was not consultancy or contract research, and perhaps I am biased when I say this, but it exemplifies the best of collaborative action:  mutual understanding of the other, a genuine exchange of ideas and thinking, and the development of new knowledge and thinking – in other words, collaborative, knowledge exchange.

Back