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Minimal Covid-19 impact on 2020 NSS results, analysis finds

The vast majority of students were satisfied with their university course in 2020, despite the Covid-19 lockdown from March, a sector-level analysis of the National Student Survey results has found.

Collegiality enhances university leadership in a post-Covid world

Jonathan Baldwin, managing director of higher education at Jisc, looks at the changing role of post-Covid university leadership and the enduring need for collaboration.

Moving the HE landscape’s quality contours … again

The government's announcement of a major review of the National Student Survey signals a worrying shift in the HE regulatory landscape, warns Jon Scott, higher education consultant and former Pro Vice-Chancellor (student experience) at the University of Leicester.

Government plans mark a seismic shift in higher education policy

Statements from ministers this week have made it clear that higher education in England is facing significant reforms, re-setting its focus towards helping to plug the UK's skills gaps and rebuilding the economy. Fariba Soetan, Policy Lead for Research and Innovation at the National Centre for Universities and Business, argues that the proposed changes bring a welcome focus on graduate outcomes and supporting the careers of young people.

UK universities affirm 'deep commitment' to high quality TNE

Universities UK and GuildHE have commissioned the Quality Assurance Agency to develop a new approach to reviewing and enhancing the quality of UK TNE. QAA will consult on a new review method later this year and will launch a programme of in-country enhancement activity in 2021.

HEi-think: Room for constructively critical students on OfS panel

Nicola Dandridge, chief executive of the Office for Students, outlines her vision for engaging with students and ensuring effective student representation on the OfS.

 

When it was first announced that I had been appointed Chief Executive of the Office for Students (OfS) Amatey Doku, the NUS' vice president for higher education, tweeted that he looked forward to working with me "to ensure that the OfS is in fact an office for students". I really liked the edge to this tweet: and it was a fair challenge. So it was a pleasure to sit down with him - and NUS members from across the country - as I set out my thoughts on how the OfS might best seek to engage with students.

To succeed, the OfS needs to have a demonstrably positive impact on students' lives in the short, medium and longer term. Everything we do must be rooted in the student interest. In order to achieve this, my starting position is that students must be meaningfully, seriously and honestly engaged in what we do and how we do it.

The NUS has a crucial role to play here. I'm looking forward to meeting with Shakira Martin, the NUS President, to discuss how we can best work together in the student interest. 

We know that the OfS' Board will be boosted by a member with a specific student representative role. This Board member will be appointed in the coming weeks, and one of their most important roles will be to chair a new Student Panel, which will bring together a group of around ten students to advise the OfS's Board.

I want the panel to feed into the set-up of the OfS, so we will be moving quickly to put a process in place for recruitment. Once we are formally established, I see the panel as have a critical role - helping ensure that we are able to engage properly with all students - including those who, for a variety of reasons, may be harder to
reach. The panel will identify and oversee some specific research, which they will define, but we will fund. We will also ask them to think ahead to how students and their priorities might be different ten years or more from now.

These are exciting roles for important times, and I am sure we will be able to appoint an excellent panel which reflects the diverse nature of higher education provision in England. I was asked in my meeting with NUS if there was room on the panel for students who might be sceptical about various aspects of higher education policy. My answer? Emphatically, yes. Of course we'll need the panel to engage constructively with us, but we should never shy away from debate, or reject out of hand views which do not mirror our own. Constructive challenge will be one of the panel's key roles: to coin a phrase from the OfS Chair, Michael Barber, we should be 'plain-speaking'
and happy to engage in a robust and honest dialogue.

We have an unparalleled opportunity to make a significant difference to students' experience and outcomes. We have been given extensive powers to act in students' interests. We want to work with them to seize the opportunity we have, so as to ensure that the OfS is indeed an Office for Students.

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