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Graduate earnings and HE admissions data mark another Groundhog Week in HE

Charlie Ball, Head of Higher Education Intelligence for Prospects at Jisc, reviews a week of higher education news which felt much like every other since lockdown, as new research on graduate earnings and university admissions was published.

Universities and students grapple with Covid and Brexit-related issues

Stephen Isherwood, chief executive of the Institute of Students Employers, reviews a week of HE news in which student accommodation, fee refunds, graduate jobs, and research funding surfaced as key issues.

Pandemic highlights gender inequality in HE

Reviewing a week in which issues affecting women’s lives were in the spotlight, Sandra Booth, Director of Policy and External Relations at the Council for Higher Education Art and Design (CHEAD), sees hopeful signs of moves to address gender equality in higher education.

Disadvantaged students and graduates need even more help in a pandemic

Commenting on a week of higher education news, Alice Gent, Policy, Research and Communications Intern, and Ruby Nightingale, Communications and Public Affairs Manager at the Sutton Trust, highlight evidence that Covid-19 is having a disproportionate impact on students and graduates from poorer backgrounds.

Fog starts to clear on road ahead for HE

Rachel Hewitt, Director of Policy and Advocacy for the Higher Education Policy Institute, sees signs of a clearer route out of the Covid crisis beginning to emerge for higher education.

HE sector in England could fall into £4bn net debt, funding chief warns

New pressures affecting the financial health of higher education institutions in England could leave the sector facing a net debt approaching £4 billion, funding chiefs have warned.

Madeleine Atkins, chief executive of the Higher Education Funding Council for England, told delegates at Hefce’s annual meeting in London that universities’ own financial projections suggested the sector as a whole will fall into the red by as much as £3.9 billion in just two years.

A report on the financial health of the HE in England due to be published by Hefce in November paints a worrying picture of falling surpluses and increasing borrowing, with significant and growing variations in the financial position of different institutions.

The forecasts also show a growing and potentially unrealistic reliance on increases in fee income from international students to prop up finances. Institutions are projecting a 25 per cent real terms rise in revenues from overseas student fees, at a time when the latest figures from the Higher Education Statistics Agency show a flattening market.

Professor Atkins commented: “There is a question of how realistic this is going to be.”

Adding to the concerns is the fact that the forecasts were taken before institutions knew the outcome of the EU referendum. The impact of Brexit is therefore not included in the calculations.

Professor Atkins warned that if overseas student numbers and fee income failed to rise, surpluses across the sector could fall to as little as 0.2 per cent of income by 2018-19.

pestario / 123RF

Institutions have been more cautious in their forecasts for capital spending, which is expected to start to fall from its high point this academic year. A quarter of the sector is holding off from committing to further capital investment in 2018-19, which may in part be due to caution over the unfolding situation over Brexit, Professor Atkins said.

The report also points to an increasing backlog in estates maintenance, not on new buildings but on keeping existing facilities up to "baseline requirements".

Professor Atkins said the overall situation presented major challenges for university senior managers and governors. While in the past a decline in the sector's finances might have been seen as a blip "there is more of a sense now that there are many issues that could impact on financial health".

 

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