Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
New regulatory framework will usher in "golden age" for HE, says OfS chair

The new regulatory framework for universities will have “an unflinching focus” on students but not reduce English  higher education to a “crude transaction between buyer and seller” said Sir Michael Barber as the government published a 181-page consultation report on its proposals.

Think tank report calls for fees to be capped as low as £5,000

Tuition fees should be capped at as low as £5,000 and the interest rate on student loans lowered to match inflation levels, according to a report published by the free-market think tank the Centre for Policy Studies.

HESA releases details on the future of student data

The Higher Education Statistics Agency has published the specification of student data to be returned by higher education providers from the 2019/20 academic year. The release represents the biggest change to the way student data is collected since the Cheltenham agency’s first data collection in 1994.

Study highlights dissatisfaction among students with multiple disadvantages

Over a quarter of students from multiple disadvantaged groups are dissatisfied with their non-academic higher education experience, new research shows.

HEi News Roundup live

Live higher education news roundup

Women researchers report gender bias in rewards and promotion

Female researchers are being rewarded less than their male peers and passed over for promotion, a new survey has revealed.

Key findings from the 2015 Careers in Research Online Survey (CROS) carried out by Vitae, the careers membership organisation, show a significant minority of women researchers perceived bias in the way they were treated.

A fifth of female researchers disagreed that there was fair treatment irrespective of gender, up from 18 per cent in 2013.

The perception of unfair treatment increased over time. Nearly a third (30 per cent) of respondents who had been research staff for more than 10 years disagreed that career progression was fair, compared to just 14 per cent who had been in the job for less than two years.

A total of 72 UK higher education institutions participated in CROS 2015, with 8,964 research staff responding.

It showed a slight decrease in the proportion of research staff employed on fixed-term contracts, but these still formed the majority (74%). The figure was considerably higher for research staff in their first position in the institution (over 90%). There was evidence to suggest a slight decrease in the use of very short contracts since 2013.

A higher percentage of female research staff were on fixed term contracts compared to males, which was not explained by disciplinary differences, age, length of experience or mode of employment.

Vitae recommended that universities undertake detailed scrutiny of their data to identify any perceptions of discrimination and unjustified inequalities between different types of research staff and with other staff.

In general, most research staff felt positive about their work/life balance, integration and recognition by their institution for their research activity.

Staff who had been on multiple short-term contracts over a long period at the same institution tended to feel less valued and have less positive feelings about their employer, job and career.

The use of staff appraisals had increased slightly, with just over two thirds reporting they had received them. Just over 60 per cent said they found them useful.

A high proportion of research staff – two thirds - continue to aspire to a career in higher education. However, the report noted that this proportion was “probably higher” than would be possible in the UK.

“Overall, this seems to suggest that many research staff do not have realistic expectations of their long term career prospects and have little knowledge of or value careers in other employment sectors,” it said.

Vitae also published its Principal Investigators and Research Leaders Survey (PIRLS), covering 55 institutions and 4316 research leaders. It found that, overall, leadership and management activities were viewed as less important than research leaders’ core personal research activity and it was in this area that they felt they gained most recognition from the institution.

Senior researchers felt lower levels of confidence when it came to the performance management of research staff, managing budgets and finances, and providing careers advice to research staff. In these areas, only around a quarter of research leaders were fully confident.

Training or continuing professional development activity was marginally higher than in 2013, although a third of respondents had undertaken one day or less in the past year and less than half more than two days.

 

 

 

wavebreakmediamicro / 123RF
Back