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Conceptions of what is excellent in higher education are starting to change

Professor Edward Peck, Vice-Chancellor of Nottingham Trent University, outlines strategies adopted by NTU that are boosting social mobility and which helped it win the inaugural Guardian University of the Year award, a gong he believes shows how notions of excellence in HE are changing.

A house divided? Growing divisions and inequalities in HE

Mike Boxall, who has thirty years' experience as a consultant and commentator on strategic developments in higher and further education, finds evidence in recent news of growing and worrying divisions within UK higher education.

UK HE must put its house in order to maintain global excellence

News on higher education over the past week highlights an urgent need for the sector to get to grips with ethical issues that have a bearing on the way it is managed and governed, argues Sandra Booth, Director of Policy and External Relations at Council for Higher Education in Art and Design (CHEAD).

Rising staff costs putting universities under greater pressure, warns Moody's

UK universities will face greater financial pressure over the next three years due to rising staff costs as they accommodate more students, retain talent and negotiate pay rises,  Moody's has warned.

Women beginning to break through HE glass ceiling

Women are beginning to break through the glass ceiling in higher education, with 29 per cent of the latest vice-chancellor posts being taken by female candidates, a survey by HEi-know has found.

In the last three years, 2012-15, and including the first two months of 2016, a total of 19 women have become university vice-chancellors out of 66 new hires, University Business reports. In the last year and two months up to February 2016, the trend appears to have accelerated with 15 women being appointed to the top position in higher education institutions. 

Progress is due to increasing awareness in universities, according to Professor Liz Barnes, Staffordshire University's new Vice-Chancellor.

"People have been gender-blind in the past and bringing the issue to the fore has helped," she said.

Professor Janet Beer, Vice-chancellor at the University of Liverpool, commented: "I am feeling very encouraged. Numbers were stuck at 16 per cent for a long time, but the fact that 29 per cent of new vice-chancellors are women is great."

The full findings of the HEi-know survey are available to HEi-know partners here.

 

Professor Liz Barnes, VC at Staffordshire University
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