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The TEF may not be perfect -- but it's still worth going for gold

As the latest Teaching Excellence and Student Outcomes Framework (TEF) results are published, Sue Reece, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Experience) at Staffordshire University, says the efforts her institution made to move up from a Silver to a Gold award were worth it, despite flaws in the TEF methodology.

Study finds progress on tackling hate crime and sexual harassment on campus

Universities awarded funding as part of a large-scale programme to tackle hate crime and sexual harassment on campus have made good progress, an evaluation of the scheme has concluded.

VCs call on Labour to re-think “implausible” plan to reduce tuition fees

Leading vice-chancellors have strongly urged the Labour leadership to reconsider its proposal to reduce tuition fees to £6,000 a year.

In a letter to The Times signed by 20 vice-chancellors who are all board members of Universities UK, including its President Professor Sir Christopher Snowden, they warn that pressure on public finances makes it “implausible” that a Labour government would be able to make up for the £10 billion of lost income that would result from lowering fees over five years.

“The result would be cuts to universities that would damage the economy, affect the quality of students’ education, and set back work on widening access to higher education,” the letter says.

Saving money to cover the cost of the fee cut by re-imposing a cap on student numbers would remove opportunities for young people and hinder economic growth, it adds.

The vice-chancellors reiterate an argument made last week by Professor Sir Steve Smith, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Exeter, that as fees are not repaid until a graduate starts to earn over £21,000, cutting the headline fee will benefit higher-earning graduates the most.

“A better way of supporting students, especially those from poorer backgrounds, would be for the government to provide greater financial support for living costs,” the letter suggests.

The letter follows growing speculation, fuelled by comments from Labour business spokesman Chuka Umunna, that Labour is poised to propose the introduction of a graduate tax to fund its fees and student finance plan. The party is reportedly preparing to introduce a graduate tax “in the medium term”.

 

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