Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
University leaders commit to pension talks as strikes begin

University leaders have written to the University and College Union to formally outline their commitment to continuing to work with UCU to deliver long-term reform of the Universities Superannuation Scheme. The move comes as UCU members at 60 universities begin strike action in disputes over both pensions and pay.

Gateway to university expertise now provides 'smart match' with business

A platform providing a single access point for businesses to university expertise and funding opportunities has been further developed by the National Centre for Universities and Business, Research England, and UK Research and Innovation, to help 'smart match' business and industry with higher education institutions, in a bid to boost R&D collaboration. Shivaun Meehan, Head of Communications at the NCUB, outlines the latest features of Konfer.

Survey pinpoints ways to make postgraduates even more satisfied

Eight out of 10 postgraduate students taking a taught course in the UK report continued satisfaction with the experience over a five-year period.But a survey of more than 70,000 postgraduates across 85 higher education institutions who responded to the Advance HE Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) highlights for the first time areas where institutions could do better still to boost satisfaction levels.

Government should listen to employers on graduate employment

The next government should adopt policies on graduate employment that reflect a less simplistic outlook than the current regime, argues Tristram Hooley, Chief Research Officer at the Institute of Student Employers, which has just published its manifesto wish list.

Universities failing to produce work-ready STEM graduates, review finds

An inquiry into science, technology, engineering and maths degrees has raised serious concerns about the employment record of some courses, including biological sciences.

The Wakeham Review, commissioned by the government in 2014, has found that too many graduates on some STEM degrees are ending up in non-graduate and low paid jobs.

As well as biological sciences, which had more than 18,000 undergraduate entrants in 2014/15, serious concerns were raised about earth, marine and environmental sciences and agriculture, animal sciences and food sciences.

To tackle the problem, universities need to ensure that graduates complete work experience as part of their course, improve their “soft” skills, and are clear about career opportunities, says a report on the review’s findings.

In a series of focus groups, employers said that universities were failing to produce “work-ready” graduates. For instance, only half of respondents from business or industry thought that biological sciences graduates met the employability requirements of industry. Recruiters complained of a lack of flexibility and resilience.

Poor maths and quantitative skills were also identified as a problem.

The review report recommends stronger collaboration between HE providers and employers to better align the supply and demand for STEM skills. Accreditation of degrees by professional bodies was highlighted as one of the most successful ways for industry to have input into courses.

Sir William Wakeham, chair of a 23-strong advisory group that led the review, also stressed the importance of early career advice.

“Careers advice should play a stronger role in STEM degrees and that as a general principle graduates ought to be encouraged to, and in practice, take greater responsibility for understanding, developing and engaging with their potential future career path,” he said.

Lower level concerns were also raised about graduate employment outcomes in Biomedical Engineering, Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Design.

The review said that further in-depth and targeted work to improve employability rates should be carried out in all the disciplines causing concern.

 

Get full easy-to-digest details on this report and more, from HEi-know

rtimages / 123RF
Back