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TNE consultation launched to protect reputation of UK HE abroad

Universities UK, GuildHE and the Quality Assurance Agency have launched a new sector-wide consultation on how to ensure the effectiveness of transnational education and protect the reputation of UK HE abroad.

Graduate employers lower entry criteria to boost diversity

Graduate employers setting no minimum entry grades have more than doubled in five years as they search for more diverse recruits, reports the Institute of Student Employers.

Progress on equality and diversity in HE 'still too slow', data shows

New higher education staff and student data published by Advance HE shows some movement towards equality goals, but the pace of progress remains slow.

UK must build on “instant” gains from post-study visa change

Interest in studying in the UK among prospective overseas students has already risen sharply following the government's decision to bring back study-study work visas. Now policy-makers and universities must build on this good news through the UK's new international strategy, says Vivienne Stern, Director of Universities UK International.

Think tank report calls for fees to be capped as low as £5,000

Tuition fees should be capped at as low as £5,000 and the interest rate on student loans lowered to match inflation levels, according to a report published by the free-market think tank the Centre for Policy Studies.

The report by the former investment banker Michael Johnson who ran David Cameron’s Economic Competitiveness Policy Group accuses the government of missing a chance to take more radical action on tuition fees by deciding to freeze them at £9,250.

The fees freeze was announced at the Conservative Party conference by Prime Minister Theresa May, along with an increase in the salary threshold at which students have to start repaying their loans from £21,000 to £25,000.  She also announced a major review of university funding, looking at issues such as how to vary the fees charged for each course.

Although the rise in the loans repayment threshold is “an acknowledgement that a fairer funding split between students and the state is required”, it could in practice see student debt write-offs sky-rocket and create a financial time bomb for future taxpayers, according to Johnson, a CPS fellow.

While the Government estimates that one-third of student loans will have to be written off, Johnson calculates the figure at more like 60 per cent or even possibly 75 per cent.

His report, Tuition Fees: A Fairer Fomula, adds: “Cutting the interest rate and the fee cap would lower students’ headline debt burden, and cause expected write-offs to plummet. This would be greatly appreciated by prospective students, and would simplify the student loan framework.”

The current repayment threshold should be maintained, says the report. A lower fees cap of £7,500, or even £5,000, together with a reduced loans interest rate,  would lower the debt burden for graduates and ensure that the Government gets more of its money back.

The proposals would create a funding gap for universities, Johnson acknowledges, which would need to be filled by central government. He recommends mitigating the costs by separating teaching from research, and treating research as investment rather than expenditure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theresa May "missed opportunity"
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