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HEi News Roundup live

Live higher education news roundup

Universities must publish evidence to back ads claims, says new guidance

Universities which use terms like “number 1” or “leading” in advertisements need to include evidence to substantiate the claims, according to new advice.

Government fee “top-ups” and student vouchers needed to solve part-time study crisis

Tuition fee “top-ups” paid to universities by the government and vouchers for students to help cover the cost of fees should be introduced to help reverse the crisis in part-time study, according to a new report.

HEi-think: Student funding proposals expose tensions over social mobility aims

The latest proposals for making the student funding system fairer, in a new report from the Sutton Trust, show how contradictory policies can arise out of social mobility objectives, warns Nick Hillman, Director of the Higher Education Policy Institute.

The implications of organisational change for UK HE

As UK higher education faces a period of exceptional change, the prospect of more mergers and acquisitions may arise. Ewan Ferlie and Susan Trenholm from King’s Business School have examined the implications and identified issues the sector may need to consider, following a research report for the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education .

HEi-think: Study shows value for money is not students' top priority

Ross Renton, Pro Vice Chancellor Students, and Sophie Williams, Students' Union Chief Executive, both at the University of Worcester, consider the implications of the findings of a new survey on students' views on the Teaching Excellence Framework.

Student well-being plays key role in satisfaction, study finds

A study of student well-being has found that social and emotional factors play a strong role in the overall student experience and satisfaction levels.

Students who are satisfied with life are more likely to be satisfied with a broad range of university services and less likely to think about leaving university early, a survey carried out by YouGov and Youthsight for Unite Students found.

The survey, which looked at non-academic elements of student life and involved 6,504 students and 2,169 applicants, found that three quarters of students (73 per cent) were satisfied with their life at the moment, while around one in ten (13 per cent) were not satisfied. Researchers found correlations between satisfaction and a number of university services and facilities, with retention and with mental health.

About one in eight (12 per cent) said they had a named mental health condition, while more than half had experienced stress, worry or strain over the four weeks leading up to the survey. In total, 16 per cent of students scored low on well-being.

Emotional resilience (defined broadly as a positive mental attitude) was linked both to retention and life satisfaction among students, authors of a report on the findings say.

The areas of student life examined included accommodation, wellbeing and life quality, financial management and employability.

Researchers identified social integration as an important factor for students. Unite Students, which is a provider of university accommodation, says satisfaction with accommodation and a sense of integration with others in a university home were linked to overall happiness and to retention.

It says a major finding was the “interconnectedness of student life” – that “students having a positive experience in one area are much more likely to be having a positive experience in others”. The report says flat-mates play a significant role, and students who are satisfied with the communal areas in their accommodation are more likely to feel integrated. Seventy per cent of students who felt satisfied with their lives were integrated with their flatmates, whereas only 40 per cent who were very dissatisfied with their lives felt integrated.

The study showed students from less wealthy homes were more likely to consider dropping out of their course (43 per cent compared with 34 per cent) and less likely to be happy with where they were living and to feel integrated there.

Unite Students Chief Executive, Richard Smith, said: “The report highlights some significant differences in experience and outcome, particularly for students from lower socioeconomic groups and for those with mental health issues.

“This research has brought home to me just how influential student accommodation, and what takes place within it, can be on student wellbeing and success.”

andresr / 123RF
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