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Advances in HE data should be on "fast forward" -- not "pause"

Data and learning analytics are like "gold dust" in higher education, and the sector cannot afford to put advances in this area on pause, argues Graham Cooper, Head of Education at Capita Education Software Solutions.

How universities are using data to boost the student experience

The use of big data to improve the student experience is a rich seam that universities are increasingly mining. In this Good Practice Briefing, HEi-know looks at a variety of approaches that have been taken by eight universities to collect and make use of data to enhance learning, and provide better support and feedback for students.

Plus ça change: old debates over the purpose of HE rumble on

Dave Hall, Registrar and Chief Operating Officer at the University of Leicester, finds the long-running argument over whether higher education's primary purpose is utilitarian or more holistic continues to dominate debate in the media on developments in the sector.

Calls for "misleading" TEF to be scrapped in current form

The Royal Statistical Society has warned that the Teaching Excellence Framework is misleading thousands of students by failing to meet the standards of trustworthiness, quality and value that the public might expect.

Johnson announces funding to boost international research

Universities and science minister Jo Johnson has announced new funding "to put the UK at the forefront of international research and inspire the next generation of world-class scientists".

Delivering the annual Campaign for Science and Engineering (CaSE) lecture, he highlighted the importance of the UK’s international research partnerships and the strength of ties with European research partners.

The minister announced the government will double the Newton Fund for international research from its current £75 million per year to £150 million per year by 2021, meaning a total investment of £735 million from 2014 to 2021. The fund will enable UK scientists to partner with academics and researchers in developing countries and emerging markets to support their economic development and the UK’s research base.

He also gave details of a new government partnership with the Wellcome Trust to deliver the £30 million Inspiring Science Capital Fund, with £20 million from government and £10 million from the Wellcome Trust. Science centres and attractions across the UK will be able to bid into the fund to refresh and refurbish exhibitions and infrastructure to inspire young people from all backgrounds to engage with science and consider a STEM career.

Addressing an audience of 400 scientists and engineers at the prestigious event at the Royal Institution, Johnson said: "Our global scientific impact far exceeds our size as a nation, and our scientists and engineers stand tall on the world’s stage. We want Britain to be the best place in Europe to innovate, and by protecting the science budget we’re giving the clearest signal that science and innovation sit at the very heart of this government’s economic plan. Extending the Newton Fund provides a unique opportunity for UK academics to work with partners around the world to address some of the biggest challenges of our time."

The minister highlighted the strength of the UK’s research partnerships with Europe and the rest of the world, pointing out that around half of all UK research publications now involve international collaborations, and European countries provide some of the UK’s closest research ties.

"Because of the excellence of our research base, it is no surprise that the UK is one of the most successful players in EU research programmes.

The UK received €7 billion (£5.3 billion) under the last Framework Programme. That made the UK one of the largest beneficiaries of EU research funding. In the current funding round, Horizon 2020, the UK has secured 15.4 per cent of funds, behind only Germany on 16.5 per cent, and with the second largest number of participating organisations," he said.

 

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