Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
HEi News Roundup live

Live higher education news roundup

HEi-think: Reasons to be worried about the future of graduate employment

New figures suggest that more graduates are finding employment or going on to further study. But there are trends within the statistics that raise questions about the direction of the graduate labour market and that could cause concern for the future, warns Stephen Isherwood, Chief Executive of the Association of Graduate Recruiters .

HEi-think: HE needs practical tools to navigate turbulent times

As UK higher education enters a period of unprecedented change and uncertainty, Tony Strike, University Secretary and Director of Strategy at the University of Sheffield, says that more than ever before universities need reliable practical tools to guide them through the challenges they face.

UK universities lose ground in latest QS world rankings

Many UK universities have fallen further behind international competitors in the latest edition of the QS World University Rankings.

“Glacial” progress on closing the gender pay gap, report finds

Closing the higher education gender pay gap will take 40 years, a new report suggests.

It's "business as usual" on Horizon 2020 research post-Brexit, minister tells universities

Universities and science minister Jo Johnson has told universities it is “business as usual” for projects currently funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, and that they should “continue to bid for EU research funding with confidence”.

In a letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England, he confirmed the pledge made over the weekend that the government would “underwrite the payment of such awards, even when specific projects continue beyond the UK’s departure from the EU”.

This means that the government will guarantee research funding granted from the EU’s €80 billion (£69 billion) fund after Brexit. UK institutions can also continue to bid for funds from it while the country remains a member.

Universities have been concerned about research funding following the UK’s referendum vote to leave the EU, despite assurances given by the pro-Brexiteers before the vote.

In Mr Johnson’s letter, published by HEFCE, he tells universities: “The work you do has made the UK a world-renowned powerhouse in science and innovation.

“Essential to this is collaborating with partners across the EU and sharing our expertise to pioneer discoveries and techniques that have a positive impact on millions across the world. That is why we have provided reassurance for Horizon 2020 projects.”

He added that the UK would “continue to be a world leader in international research and innovation” and that the government expected to ensure “that close collaboration between the UK and the EU in science continues”.

On Saturday, the Chancellor Philip Hammond said EU funding for farmers as well as that given through Horizon 2020 would be guaranteed.  A letter sent by David Gauke, Chief Secretary to the Treasury, to David Davis, the Secretary of State for Exiting the EU, attempts to address the concerns of various sectors and “the uncertainty for recipients of these funding streams”.

Mr Gauke wrote: “Multi-year projects administered by government with signed contracts or funding agreements in place, and projects to be signed in the ordinary course of business before the Autumn Statement, will be fully funded, even when these projects continue beyond the UK’s departure from the EU”.

Commenting on the news, Alistair Jarvis, Deputy Chief Executive of Universities UK said: "This is encouraging news that provides much needed stability for British universities during the transition period as the UK exits the EU and provides an important signal to European researchers that they can continue to collaborate with their UK colleagues as they have before.

"Horizon 2020 research funding supports British researchers to collaborate with international partners to deliver cutting-edge research that benefits the economy, society and British people.

"We hope that the Government will now move quickly to address the uncertainty amongst EU students considering applying to British universities by confirming that those beginning courses before we exit the EU will be subject to current fees levels and financial support arrangements for the duration of their course."

Professor Dave Phoenix, Chair of MillionPlus and Vice-Chancellor of London South Bank University, said:

“This is excellent news for universities and offers significant reassurance to researchers working on vital projects. However, guarantees for research funding only go part-way to ensuring stability in UK universities during the Brexit transition.

“The Chancellor now needs to confirm that access to loan funding for EU students who commence their courses before Brexit is also guaranteed for their full period of study. This is crucial for UK universities and given students are already seeking information for 2017 entry is increasingly urgent.”

Dr Sarah Main, chair of the Campaign for Science and Engineering, said:

"The assurance that the Treasury will underwrite successful EU research bids up until the UK exits the EU, and for the lifetime of the award after we leave the EU, is a considerable commitment that potentially stretches 7-10 years into the future. This surely shows the commitment of the Government to science.

"What we need now is to secure the longer term conditions that will enable science to thrive - a suite of policies that sustain flow of global talent, an 'in house' regulatory framework for the UK that enables us to work with the whole world, and an investment programme that sees the UK step up to the ambition for research and innovation set by Europe and the United States."

 

Jo Johnson
Back