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HEi-know Weekly HE News Review: Diversity matters

Mike Ratcliffe, Academic Registrar at Nottingham Trent University, reviews HE sector news in a week when T levels, educational “snobbery”, Oxbridge admissions, and a new universities minister made the headlines.

MPs urge the government to break down barriers to nursing degree apprenticeships

Nursing degree apprenticeships as a successful and sustainable route into the profession will forever be a mirage unless barriers to delivery are torn down, MPs have warned.

UUK roundtable to consider flagging students' mental health problems to parents

Universities UK is bringing together university leaders, mental health experts, and students and parents to consider when a nominated family member or another appropriately identified person might be contacted if a student is suffering with poor mental health or in acute distress.

Graduate earnings probed, unconditional offers questioned, a business levy proposed, and a minister resigned … another news-packed week in HE

Professor Mark Smith, Vice-Chancellor of Lancaster University, and Nicola Owen, Lancaster’s Chief Administrative Officer and Secretary, kick off a new series of HEi-know weekly higher education news reviews, highlighting and commenting on some of the most significant and interesting HE stories and opinions of the past week.

UUK calls for government and universities to prepare for “no deal” Brexit

In the event of a ‘no-deal’ Brexit, the Government must unilaterally secure EU citizens rights and strengthen its pledge to underwrite UK participation in EU research programmes, according to new guidance from Universities UK.

HEi-think: Study shows value for money is not students' top priority

Ross Renton, Pro Vice Chancellor Students, and Sophie Williams, Students' Union Chief Executive, both at the University of Worcester, consider the implications of the findings of a new survey on students' views on the Teaching Excellence Framework. 

 

An informal consortium of students’ unions has produced what they are describing as the UK’s largest research project to date on students’ views of the Teaching Excellence Framework metrics. The report from Trendence UK gathers the views of almost 9,000 full-time undergraduate and post graduate students in 123 institutions. Notably there are no mentions of the more formal consortium, the National Union of Students or any work they may have carried out in this area.

For most universities there will be very few surprises in the outcomes of the research, particularly where there already exists a close relationship between the institution, students and Students’ Union. Within the University of Worcester, we carried out an exercise last year to gather the views of students and staff on what they think is excellent teaching, which helped to inform our own TEF submission. 

Most of the students surveyed in this new research supported the idea of an exercise that encourages excellence in teaching . Perhaps this would also be the case if we asked this question of the public? Universities should seriously consider what they need to do in response to student’s belief identified in the study that the TEF should also consider IT and library resources. This could easily be captured in future versions of the TEF from
resource spend data or targeted questions within the NSS.

Outcomes, and specifically value for money, have been a key feature of the rhetoric surrounding the new higher education landscape from both the media and the Government. What they might find surprising is that employability - one of the few easily measurable outcomes - is at the bottom of the list of factors that demonstrate a university has excellent teaching. What is often missed is the value students place on having access to high quality staff.  This study supports that opinion with staffing being the number one factor to measure quality, from students' point of view. We recognise this opinion from our own students at Worcester, where teaching and contact with teachers is what students expect and value most. 

It is also interesting to see that students don’t consider retention and progression data as relevant as we might perhaps expect. This may be due to some students believing that this is also the responsibility of the individual to engage and participate rather than the just the University. Students are sometimes the ones who are most critical of their peers failing to engage, whilst staff attempt to retain students as much as possible.

To state the obvious, no one wants a Bronze TEF rating! Fundamentally, as much as no university wants a Bronze, students also don’t want to be at a Bronze institution. What many of us may not have predicted is that 11 per cent of students from an ethnic minority background say that they would have reconsidered applying to their university if it had been rated Gold. Why would a Gold rating put students off applying? It would be disastrous if such a large number of students were to be deterred either through self-doubt or concerns about the perceived culture of a ‘Gold’ institution. The Office for Students needs to seriously consider what can be done to prevent this potential issue by encouraging collaboration between institutions with initiatives such as the National Collaborative Outreach Programme.

The Government should be interested to learn that students have a more nuanced understanding of the relationship they have with their University. It is evident that ‘Value for Money’ is not the main focus of the relationship. The Government wanted the TEF to provide a ‘clear signal to students’ about ‘value for money and
potential employment outcomes’. This report signals that our students may have other priorities that need to be considered.

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