Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
University leaders commit to pension talks as strikes begin

University leaders have written to the University and College Union to formally outline their commitment to continuing to work with UCU to deliver long-term reform of the Universities Superannuation Scheme. The move comes as UCU members at 60 universities begin strike action in disputes over both pensions and pay.

Gateway to university expertise now provides 'smart match' with business

A platform providing a single access point for businesses to university expertise and funding opportunities has been further developed by the National Centre for Universities and Business, Research England, and UK Research and Innovation, to help 'smart match' business and industry with higher education institutions, in a bid to boost R&D collaboration. Shivaun Meehan, Head of Communications at the NCUB, outlines the latest features of Konfer.

Survey pinpoints ways to make postgraduates even more satisfied

Eight out of 10 postgraduate students taking a taught course in the UK report continued satisfaction with the experience over a five-year period.But a survey of more than 70,000 postgraduates across 85 higher education institutions who responded to the Advance HE Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) highlights for the first time areas where institutions could do better still to boost satisfaction levels.

Government should listen to employers on graduate employment

The next government should adopt policies on graduate employment that reflect a less simplistic outlook than the current regime, argues Tristram Hooley, Chief Research Officer at the Institute of Student Employers, which has just published its manifesto wish list.

Postgraduate researchers report high anxiety levels

Postgraduate researchers are suffering high levels of anxiety and many want more support, according to new research.

HEi-think: Royal Society-British Academy project will address educational research crisis

The Royal Society and British Academy have launched a joint project to examine how best to harness new and up-to-date research methodologies, using the latest technologies, big data and interdisciplinary approaches, to improve educational outcomes for young people in the UK and internationally. Professor John Leach, Pro Vice-Chancellor at Sheffield Hallam University, who is a member of the working group for the project, explains why it is needed.

 

The Royal Society and British Academy have launched a joint project on educational research, which comes with a call for evidence

The United Kingdom has a strong track record of producing excellent educational research, and using research to inform both policy and practice.  In 2014, 66% of the work in education submitted to the Research Excellence Framework (REF) was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent, which is almost exactly the same proportion as for the social sciences as a whole.  Furthermore, more than three quarters of the score for impact was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent.  The critiques on the quality and relevance of educational research made in the 1990s by Hillage and others do not appear salient today.

However, educational research capacity is under threat.  There was a 15% reduction in the number of researchers submitted to the REF in 2014 when compared to the Research Assessment Exercise in 2008.  Anecdotal evidence suggests that fewer early career educational researchers are graduating with PhDs and securing academic positions in UK universities: the age profile of UK educational researchers is rising and there is no obvious mechanism for securing succession.  The information revolution is also making an impact on the ways both education and educational research is conducted.  Massive amounts of data about education are now available for analysis, and there are new mechanisms for producing and disseminating knowledge.

It is against this background that the Royal Society and British Academy project is being launched.  Although restricted to science and mathematics education, these issues were identified in the Royal Society's 2014 report  Vision for science and mathematics education.  The scope of the current project was broadened to address all aspects of educational research, in recognition that education operates as a system, and that not all educational research is conducted by people who work in universities.  Educational research is an international endeavour, and the scope of the project will include gathering evidence from other nations about the generation and use of research knowledge to inform educational policy and practice.

The irony of writing a post about enhancing evidence-informed policy-making in education this week has not escaped me.  Our government has just put out for consultation a Green Paper which, if implemented, will see permission given for (English) schools to reject pupils because they are not sufficiently academically able, and for funding currently spent by universities on widening participation to be diverted into university sponsorship of schools. 

My colleague Professor Chris Husbands, Vice-Chancellor of Sheffield Hallam University,  recently blogged  about grammar schools, describing the evidence suggesting that they will do the opposite of what the green paper says (i.e. grammar schools have the option to reject pupils, rather than giving parents the choice to select schools for their children; grammar schools don't address the needs of modern economies for large numbers of highly-skilled workers; it isn't possible to predict reliably attainment at 16 or 18 in tests administered at 11).  Evidence about the outcomes of university sponsorship of schools is no more convincing.  I am aware of excellent schools which have university sponsors (including the schools sponsored by Sheffield Hallam University) - but a quick Google search will show that there are examples of failure as well as success.  What is the evidence that university sponsorship of schools leads to better outcomes than other governance arrangements?

Evidence-informed education policy-making and practice needs support from those of us in the HE system.  The RS and BA are championing the cause through this project.  Please respond to the call for evidence.

 

dizanna / 123RF
Back