Login

close

Login

If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.


Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
University leaders commit to pension talks as strikes begin

University leaders have written to the University and College Union to formally outline their commitment to continuing to work with UCU to deliver long-term reform of the Universities Superannuation Scheme. The move comes as UCU members at 60 universities begin strike action in disputes over both pensions and pay.

Gateway to university expertise now provides 'smart match' with business

A platform providing a single access point for businesses to university expertise and funding opportunities has been further developed by the National Centre for Universities and Business, Research England, and UK Research and Innovation, to help 'smart match' business and industry with higher education institutions, in a bid to boost R&D collaboration. Shivaun Meehan, Head of Communications at the NCUB, outlines the latest features of Konfer.

Survey pinpoints ways to make postgraduates even more satisfied

Eight out of 10 postgraduate students taking a taught course in the UK report continued satisfaction with the experience over a five-year period.But a survey of more than 70,000 postgraduates across 85 higher education institutions who responded to the Advance HE Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) highlights for the first time areas where institutions could do better still to boost satisfaction levels.

Government should listen to employers on graduate employment

The next government should adopt policies on graduate employment that reflect a less simplistic outlook than the current regime, argues Tristram Hooley, Chief Research Officer at the Institute of Student Employers, which has just published its manifesto wish list.

Postgraduate researchers report high anxiety levels

Postgraduate researchers are suffering high levels of anxiety and many want more support, according to new research.

HEi-think: High quality teaching does most to boost value for money perceptions

Key findings of the latest Student Academic Experience Survey from Advance HE and the Higher Education Policy Institute are outlined and examined by Jonathan Neves, Advance HE Head of Insights and co-author of a report on the survey results.

 

The Student Academic Experience Survey (SAES), published jointly by Advance HE and HEPI, has for the past 12 years been providing topical insight into the evolving perceptions of UK undergraduates.

One of the customary headlines centres around value for money, with the previous five years to 2017 seeing a consistent decline, to the point where almost as many students perceived poor value in their experience as good value. Encouragingly, this has been reversed in 2018, with a three percentage point increase (35% to 38%) in the proportion of students who see their experience as representing good or very good value. This has been driven by a statistically significant increase among students from England, although value in England remains relatively low.

As a result of a new question added this year, we now know what lies behind these value perceptions. Students who perceive good value are most likely to cite teaching quality driving their perception – as well as course facilities, career prospects and campus development, while students who perceive poor value are most likely to relate their perceptions to the level of tuition fees as well as, among other factors, the cost of living. Clearly, these cost-related factors are not something that universities can solve on their own, and help put into perspective the role of universities in delivering value. 

We can speculate as to what may lie behind this year’s increase in value for money, but there appears little doubt that the last few years have seen a greater focus across the sector on teaching quality, not least through the TEF, and we now have evidence that teaching quality is key to value. There are also findings this year which highlight how TEF Gold institutions are more likely to deliver better value in the eyes of students in our sample.

For students who may be weighing up a decision on whether or not to go to university, there are now a wide range of alternative options available at age 18, including apprenticeships and other vocational choices. Despite this, however, the 2018 SAES shows that the large majority of students are happy with their choice. Two out of three students, looking back on their decision, would make the same choice of course and institution again given the chance, while only 5 per cent in total would make a very different decision and choose not to enter higher education.

Despite this evidence of a positive experience overall, our analysis highlights some groups of students who are not benefitting in the same way. We have seen before that where and how students live can have a bearing on their experience, and by analysing a new group of students this year – commuter students who live at home – we can see how living far away from both the university and other students can link through to a less satisfactory experience. By contrast, students who live with others in halls or shared houses report benefits in their learning development.

The 2018 SAES provides clear evidence that UK domiciled students of Asian ethnicity are less likely to have a satisfactory experience at university. The reasons behind this are unclear, but alongside lower perception of value and learning gain, Asian students are also more critical of teaching staff. Asian students show a high propensity to live at home and commute, which means that they may face logistical barriers during their time at university. However, we have conducted statistical analysis which has stripped out the impact of accommodation status on ethnic differences, and this has identified that irrespective of their living arrangements, Asian students still have a tendency to report a less positive experience. This is clearly an area where further investigation is required across the sector in order to fully understand the factors at play and ensure that institutions can take action to ensure a consistent experience for all.

Another issue that the 2018 SAES has raised is the notion of students’ attitudes to workload. Although there are numbers of students with very low levels of workload, there is increasing evidence that this is not what students are looking for. Levels of wellbeing and value for money are higher among students with highest workloads, and low levels of workload are most strongly linked to students questioning their decision to enter higher education.

These and other results across the survey highlight that students want to play an active role their university experience and recognise how time spent on study will bring them the benefits that they are looking for.

 

andresr / 123RF
Back