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Access to HE has a bright future after 25 years of achievement

Val Yates, Director of Access and Inclusion at the University of Worcester, raises the curtain on an annual access and continuing education event, now in its 25 th year, taking place at her institution this week.

Universities with top social media reviews do well in NSS and TEF

Universities that are rated highly on Facebook and other online review sites tend to do better in formal measures of learning and teaching, new research suggests.

HEi-think: High quality teaching does most to boost value for money perceptions

Key findings of the latest Student Academic Experience Survey from Advance HE and the Higher Education Policy Institute are outlined and examined by Jonathan Neves, Advance HE Head of Insights and author of a report on the survey results.

Rating boost for half of institutions that reapplied to TEF 2018

Half of the institutions that reapplied to the Teaching Excellence and Student Outcomes Framework in 2018 saw their rating improve.

CUC publishes new code on senior university staff pay

The Committee of University Chairs has published a new voluntary code for setting the pay of senior university staff.

New universities leap ahead in latest Guardian rankings

New universities are challenging the historical hierarchy in UK higher education  as a significant number leaped ahead of Russell Group institutions in the latest Guardian league tables .

Volatility at home and Brexit spell uncertainty for UK universities, warns Moody's

UK universities face significant uncertainty stemming from domestic policy volatility and the impact of Brexit, according to a report by the leading credit rating agency Moody's.

Advance HE announces Athena Swan review

Advance HE has announced plans to conduct a major review of the Athena SWAN Charter -- a flagship accreditation scheme which recognises the work of higher education institutions and research institutes to address gender equality within academia and research.

A quarter of stressed students consider dropping out of university, study finds

Over a quarter of students are so stressed during exam periods that they seriously consider dropping out of university, a new study has found.

HEi News Roundup 25 April 2016

 

Visitors: Welcome to our live HE news roundup page, which is free to view until 27 May 2016. You can get all of this plus a summary of the day's events and reports, as well as parliamentary activity, direct to your mailbox at 8am each weekday from our Daily Update Newsletter -- find out more.

 

For a comprehensive roundup of the current week's HE news, please visit our live HE News Roundup page

 

Friday April 29

 

WARNING SIGNS AS UNIVERSITIES ENJOY "BOOM TIME"

Former Financial Times education correspondent Miranda Green examines the significant investment in campus developments by UK universities buoyed by rising fee income and low borrowing rates, but warns there are risks associated with this growth, particularly through trends in income from international students.

FT

 

GRADUATES BEGIN TO FEEL THE IMPACT OF STUDENT LOANS

Professor John Cater, Vice-Chancellor of Edge Hill University, looks at the potential long-term impact of student loan repayments now being faced by those leaving university last summer.

THE

 

TEN UNIVERSITIES WHERE STUDENTS GET THE HIGHEST GRADES

The Independent lists the top ten universities where students are awarded the highest grades, according to the Complete University Guide.

Independent

 

OPPOSITION DAY DEBATE ON PLANS TO SCRAP NHS BURSARIES

Heidi Alexander, Labour’s shadow health secretary, has called an “opposition day debate” on the government’s plans to scrap NHS bursaries for student nurses and midwives. The debate, on May 4, will be based on a cross-party motion igned by 139 MPs from all major parties, including the Conservative MP and former nurse Maria Caulfield.

Nursing Times

 

BATH UNIVERSITY TO OPEN LONDON BASE

The University of Bath is to set up a facility in London's Pall Mall to enhance the impact of its academic research and expand its executive education offer. The facility, to be opened in the autumn, will be used for workshops, master classes and networking events with existing and new business partners.

University Business

 

LIFETIME LEARNING AND MATURE STUDENTS NEED TO BE VALUED, SAYS VC

Peter Horrocks, vice chancellor of the Open University, argues that lifetime learning must be valued as highly as traditional degrees and part-time and mature students should be given the same amount of support as sixth formers going to university.

WonkHE

 

OUTWARDLY MOBILE STUDENTS VITAL TO SOFT POWER AGENDA, SAYS WILLETTS

David Willetts, the former universities minister, said outbound student mobility was essential to the country’s soft power agenda. Speaking at the International Unit's Go International event this week, Willetts said two-way mobility programmes facilitate negotiations with overseas partners.

PIE

 

HIGHER EDUCATION SPENDING INCREASES BY 6 PER CENT

Spending on UK higher education providers increased by 6 per cent in 2014-15 to £31.2 billion, new figures from the Higher Education Statistics Agency show. Some £33.2 billion in income was received by UK higher education in the last full academic year, up from £30.7 billion in 2013-14, an 8.1 per cent rise.

THE

 

CLAIMS THAT ECONOMICS LECTURER HAS BEEN REASSIGNED BECAUSE HE IS "TOO RADICAL"

Alberto Paloni, a Glasgow University economics lecturer whose teaching material has been described as “too radical”, has been stopped from teaching a core degree module, leading to claims of further erosion in the pluralism of economics degrees. He is an expert in post-Keynesian theory. A spokeswoman for the university said the reassign of Dr Paloni came was part of the normal review process.

THE

 

GUIDE SHOWS UNIVERSITIES WITH THE HIGHEST PROPORTION OF FIRSTS AND UPPER SECONDS

University applicants who want to graduate with a first or upper second class honours degree should try to get in to Oxbridge, according to the latest Complete University Guide (CUG) rankings. The two universities have the highest proportion of the top honours degrees, followed by St Andrews and Durham.

Independent

 

STUDENT DEBT COULD PUT THE LESS AFFLUENT OFF GOING TO UNIVERSITY

An opinion piece in the Guardian suggests that the big debts that English students face could deter young people from less affluent backgrounds.

Guardian

 

Editor's 8am overview

The Times follows up on the FT's story today on universities funding with low-cost loans an "expansion boom" to attract more international students, holding up as an example UCL's announcement on a £280m loan from the European Investment Bank to pay for campus developments.

The BBC follows on the Sutton Trust report on graduate debt with a video asking whether a degree is worth the investment.

Meanwhile, HEi-know raises the curtain on Media FHE's coverage next week of the British Council's Going Global conference in Cape Town, where a sizeable contingent of UK vice-chancellors and international staff will gather to network and debate a wide range of international HE issues. You can follow our coverage on the
Going Global and Media FHE websites and on Twitter @HEGoingGlobal #GoingGlobal2016.

 

ACADEMIC LIFE CAN BE A RECIPE FOR ANXIETY

A contributor to the Guardian's Academics Anonymous column describes life as an academic suffering from generalised anxiety disorder, with symptoms often triggered by the demands and challenges of being an academic on a fixed term contract.

Guardian

 

FAKE NOTTINGHAM TRENT DISSERTATION GOES VIRAL

A Nottingham Trent University student's Twitter post went viral when it featured a photo of the title page of his dissertation featuring everyday Millennial slang.

Huffington Post

 

UNIVERSITIES BORROW £3BN FOR NEW EXPANSION BOOM

The Times reports that universities in London are leading a move by the sector to borrow over £3 billion to fund an "unprecedented era of expansion" and meet booming demand for places from international students. It holds up as an example University College London's announcement that it has secured a £280 million loan, the largest amount lent to a university by the European Investment Bank, to pay for a new campus on the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in east London and upgrade and expand buildings on the Bloomsbury campus. University Business also has an article on the UCL loan and campus developments.

The Times

University Business

 

OBSESSION WITH RANKINGS CAN OBSTRUCT GLOBAL HE COLLABORATION, CONFERENCE HEARS

A “designer handbag” approach to university partnerships based on global rankings is obscuring the real opportunities for partnership between universities across the world with common interests, the British Council’s Going Global 2016 conference will hear.

HEi-know

 

Thursday April 28

 

GRADUATE DEBT: IS IT WORTH IT?

In a video the BBC looks at the findings of the Sutton Trust report showing that graduate debt in England is higher than in any other Anglophone country, and examines whether a degree is worth the investment.

BBC

 

FORMER ARCHBISHOP CALLS ON CAMBRIDGE TO DIVEST FROM FOSSIL FUELS

The former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, now master of Magdalene college, has called for Cambridge University to divest from fossil fuels. He made his comments in a foreword to a 74-page report on divestment by student campaign group Cambridge Zero Carbon Society.

Guardian

 

BENEFITS OF BREXIT

Philip B. Whyman, professor of economics and Director of the Lancashire Institute for Economic and Business Research at the University of Central Lancashire, sets out the economic arguments in favour of the UK leaving the EU.

The Conversation

 

Editor's 8am overview

The Sutton Trust has raised the spectre of graduate debt in England with a report that shows this is now higher than average levels in other Anglophone countries, including the United States. The story has predictably been picked up by a wide range of media. Meanwhile, the Financial Times reports that, fuelled by rising fee income, UK universities are enjoying a "boom time" leading to significant growth in their estate.

An unreported study by Hobsons and Buila, covered today by HEi-know in a Briefing Report, reveals the extent to which UK higher education has been adversely affected by government student visa and immigration policies. Also on HEi-know, we look at two new pieces of research from the Leadership Foundation for HE examining leadership issues, including managing the process of demonstrating impact in the Research Excellence Framework.

UCAS publishes interim applicant figures today, as Which? University produces survey findings showing that many applicants regrets their A level choices.

 

BOOM TIME FOR UK UNIVERSITIES LEADS TO EXPANSION

Financial Times columnist Miranda Green points to a £280m loan to University College London to fund ambitious expansion plans as a sign of "boom times" for UK universities, fuelled by rising fee income, leading to significant expansion and investment in capital growth.

FT

 

MORE FOCUS NEEDED ON STUDENT RETENTION

David Laws, chair of the UPP Foundation advisory board and minister for schools and the Cabinet Office in the previous coalition government, argues that there needs to be more attention paid to issues such as support for mental health that can affect retention of students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

THE

 

FIRST NON-STEM ATHENA SWAN AWARD WINNERS ANNOUNCED

The first arts, humanities and social science university departments to win an Athena SWAN gender equality award have been announced. Overall, 84 successful Athena SWAN awards, including seven at institutional level, were granted from 128 applications. The University of Sheffield picked up a silver institutional award, while departments at the universities of Lancaster, Sheffield Hallam, and Hull were among bronze award winners; and departments at Exeter University, Leicester, and Sheffield were among silver award winners.

THE

 

HEFCE QUALITY PLAN REPRESENTS "GRAB FOR POWER" CRITICS WARN

Terms and conditions under the Higher Education Funding Council for England's plans to outsource quality assurance represent a "worrying move for power in the sector", according to critics of the proposals.

THE

 

GRADUATE DEBT HIGHER IN ENGLAND THAN OTHER ANGLOPHONE COUNTRIES

Graduate debt in England has risen to higher levels than in the United States, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the rest of the UK, according to a report from the Sutton Trust. Typical English graduate debt under the £9,000 fees system in England is £44,500 and could rise to £50,000, compared for example with £19,100 to £29,100 in the US.

HEi-know

THE

Telegraph

BBC

FT

Daily Mail

Huffington Post

 

A THIRD OF UNIVERSITY APPLICANTS REGRET A LEVEL CHOICES, SURVEY FINDS

Nearly a third of university applicants wish they had chosen different A level subjects, according to research from Which? University. A survey of over 1,000 students conducted by Youthsight for Which? also found that four in ten wished they had thought more about what subjects might help them get into university.

HEi-know

BBC

 

BIG BROTHER WORRIES MUST NOT HOLD UP LEARNING ANALYTICS

Phil Richards, chief innovation officer at JISC, argues that concerns over the ethical use of learning analytics must not be allowed to hold up progress in this vital area.

WonkHE

 

Wednesday April 27

 

THE VALUE OF EMPLOYER-SPONSORED DEGREES

Professor David Phoenix, Vice-Chancellor of London South Bank University, sets out the case for supporting more employer-sponsored degrees.

UUK

 

UNIVERSITIES MAY BE URGED TO HELP BUILD STUDENTS' CHARACTER, CONFERENCE TOLD

Universities may soon be called upon to follow schools in delivering "character education" to build their students' social capital, a conference on the future of STEM subjects heard.

THE

 

AFRICAN "RUSSELL GROUP-STYLE" ALLIANCE OPENS UP OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE WEST

A new “Russell-Group type” alliance  of 15 leading research-intensive institutions from eight African countries opens up opportunities for more Western collaborations with African universities outside South Africa, according Jo Beall, the British Council’s director of education and society. Speaking to THE ahead of the British Council’s annual Going Global conference, which will be held in Cape Town from 3 to 5 May, she warned that Western universities must prove they do not have ‘imperialist’ designs on the continent.

THE

 

NURSES WARNING OVER PLAN TO SCRAP STUDENT BURSARIES

Nurses at Unison's annual health conference have warned that safe staffing in hospitals could be at risk as the government's plans to scrap student bursaries reduce the supply of new recruits.

Nursing Times

 

Editor's 8am overview

Questions over the value of a degree have surfaced again following publication of figures by BIS showing a fall in the proportion of graduates entering graduate jobs. Though the actual drop is small, at 2.2 per cent, it is likely to keep policymakers' minds trained on how to better inform prospective students about their job prospects. Overseas students, however, may be more likely to be influenced in their university choice on whether it has featured in a movie, according to a report from the BBC.

With the devolved elections in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland looming, the Campaign for Science and Engineering has gathered together and analysed the main parties' science and engineering policies.

Meanwhile, the Guardian reports that the American higher education jobs consultant Karen Kelsy is touring the UK warning that our universities are beginning to suffer from the same negative impact of insecure academic contracts and soaring student debt that is afflicting the US sector.

 

CASE ANALYSES POLITICAL PARTIES' SCIENCE POLICIES IN DEVOLVED ELECTIONS

The Campaign for Science and Engineering has gathered together and analysed the main political parties' science and engineering policies for the forthcoming devolved elections in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

CaSE

 

LANCASTER SIGNS MOU WITH SOUTH AFRICAN ACADEMY

The University of Lancaster has signed a memorandum of understanding with Gauteng City Region Academy in South Africa to explore mutually beneficial collaborative research, training and exchanges. 

University Business

 

STUDY SUGGESTS OVERSEAS STUDENTS' CHOICE OF UNIVERSITY IS INFLUENCED BY FILMS

The BBC looks at to what extent international students are influenced by films in their choice of university, following a study of Chinese and South Korean students that suggests this is so. The story cites the University of Leicester's links with Bollywood which it says has raised its profile among Indian students.

BBC

 

TOP 10 UNIVERSITIES IN LONDON

The Independent follows up on the publication of the Complete University Guide league table on Monday with a ranking of the top ten universities in London, according to the Guide.

Independent

 

Tuesday April 26

 

MILLION+ AND NUS URGE STUDENTS TO "VOTE REMAIN"

Students have been urged to vote for the UK to remain in the European Union in an open letter from the new universities association Million+ and the National Union of Students.

Million+

 

ACADEMICS SHOULD WORK MORE CLOSELY WITH POLICYMAKERS

Mark Shucksmith, professor of planning and director of the Institute for Social Renewal at Newcastle University, argues that academics can better use their research to inform and work more closely with policymakers. The THE also reports on a paper from Professor Shucksmith, published by the Carnegie UK Trust, in which he presents his case.

THE

THE Carnegie paper

 

HIGHER EDUCATION JOBS CONSULTANT SOUNDS WARNING OVER ACADEMIC CONTRACTS

American higher education jobs consultant Karen Kelsy is warning that UK universities are beginning to suffer from the same negative impact of insecure academic contracts and soaring student debt that is afflicting the US sector.

Guardian

 

NEW GOVERNMENT FIGURES RAISE MORE QUESTIONS OF VALUE OF A DEGREE

New labour market statistics published by the government show there was a 2.2 per cent drop in the number of 21 to 30-year-old graduates in skilled work in 2015 compared with a year earlier, raising further questions over the value of a degree. Meanwhile, in the Guardian, journalist Helen Whitehouse argues that non-graduates can often have an advantage in the jobs market.

FT

BIS

Guardian

 

Editor's 8am overview

The annual Ross-CASE report has been published, providing a snapshot of trends in philanthropic giving to universities. The latest statistics suggest universities will need to work harder at developing alumni relations, as the number of donors is not increasing -- but the report warns there is a risk that regulations introduced by the Etherington Review on fundraising could act as obstacles.

Elsewhere, "no-platforming" by student unions continues to make headlines, with London mayor Boris Johnson the latest target, following his comments on American President Barack Obama's heritage. An NUS official has stoked the flames by arguing that the policy is right because "some people have more equal rights than others".

Cambridge University is ruffling feathers on the research front with its submission to the REF review, calling for all academic staff to be submitted.

 

 

CONSULTATION ON UK INNOVATION LAUNCHED

The UK government has opened a public consultation on innovation to help it develop a National Innovation Plan to be published later this year.

HEi-know

 

SURREY WELCOMES NEW VC

World-renowned academic and engineer, Professor G.Q. Max Lu, has taken up post as the fifth President and Vice-Chancellor at the University of Surrey, following the departure of Professor Sir Christopher Snowden at the end of last year.  Acting Vice-Chancellor, Professor Michael Kearney, will take up the role of Provost.

HEi-know

 

EDINBURGH STUDENTS IN PROTEST AGAINST PREVENT STRATEGY

Students at Edinburgh University are staging at sit-in to protest over the UK-wide implementation of the government's Prevent counter-terrorism measures on campus. Meanwhile, Edinburgh has  introduced a policy of monitoring the social media activity of student activists to keep abreast of campaigns and protests.

Herald Scotland

 

NUS OFFICER SAYS "SOME PEOPLE HAVE MORE EQUAL RIGHTS THAN OTHERS"

A National Union of Students officer defending the NUS policy of "no platforming" controversial speakers on campus has said that "some people have more equal rights than others".

Huffington Post

 

TORY BACKBENCHERS OPPOSE COMPULSORY ACADEMIES

Education secretary Nicky Morgan faces a revolt from Tory backbenchers over the government's plans to require all schools in England to become academies.

BBC

Telegraph

 

CAMBRIDGE CALLS FOR ALL STAFF TO BE SUBMITTED TO THE REF

The University of Cambridge has called for a shake-up of the Research Excellence Framework under which all academic staff at each university, even those on teaching-only contracts, would be submitted to the REF. The proposal, contained in Cambridge's submission to the Stern review of the REF, has been opposed by the University Alliance.

THE

 

REPORT HIGHLIGHTS GROWING IMPORTANCE OF ALUMNI DONATIONS

The value of fostering good alumni relations is hightlighted in a report on the latest Ross-CASE survey on philanthropic giving in UK higher education, which shows that the sector is receiving more generous gifts from a flat number of donors. HEi-know has a briefing report on all the key findings. The THE reports on a warning from CASE on the possible impact of regulations introduced by the Etherington review on fundraising.

HEi-know Briefing Report 294

THE

The Times

 

Monday April 25

 

STANFORD ADVISERS CALLED IN TO HELP UK UNIVERSITIES COMMERCIALISE RESEARCH

Consultants from Stanford University have been called in to advise UK universities and Whitehall mandarins on how to boost commercialisation of research, including demanding less equity share in spinouts.

FT

 

MORE STUDENTS TURN TO CROWDFUNDING TO FINANCE THEIR STUDY

The Guardian looks at the growing number of students turning to crowdfunding sites to help them cover the cost of their study, and talks to some who have managed to raise money.

Guardian

 

TOP TEN UNIVERSITIES FOR LAUNCHING CAREERS

The Independent lists the top ten universities for graduate prospects leading to professional careers or higher level study, according to The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide.

Independent

  

GREENWICH BACKS FOREIGN TALENT WITH VISA COMPETITION

The Financial Times looks at an initiative from the University of Greenwich where overseas students are invited to pitch for one of 20 graduate entrepreneur visas allocated to the institution.

FT

 

STUDENTS SUPPORT NUS "NO PLATFORM" POLICY

Nearly two thirds of students support the National Union of Students in its policy of "no platforming" controversial speakers on campus, a survey suggests. The Independent reports that in response to the findings, human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell has said the NUS policy has "gone too far" and is supressing free speech. Meanwhile, Telegraph columnist Brendan O'Neill questions a decision by a student society at King's College London to withdraw an invitation to speak to Boris Johnson over his comments about American President Barack Obama's heritage.

BBC

Independent

Telegraph

 

SHOULD UNIVERSITIES ASK FOR DONATIONS FROM THEIR ALUMNI?

Richard Budd, a lecturer in education studies at Liverpool Hope University, challenges the growing practice by universities of seeking donations from their alumni.

THE

 

COMPLETE UNIVERSITY GUIDE SHOWS STEADY STATE IN UNIVERSITY RANKINGS

There is little turbulence in this year’s university rankings published by the Complete University Guide, with few big risers or fallers. This year the Guide has also produced a league table of institutions with the most and least number of unresolved student complaints, the THE reports. Kent is among universities in the top ten for the least number of unresolved cases, while Leicester finds itself among the ten with the most number.

HEi-know

Complete University Guide

THE

THE student complaints

WonkHE

Independent

 

Sunday April 24

 

NEW NUS PRESIDENT REJECTS CRITICISM

Writing in The Guardian, the new NUS president Malia Bouattia responds to criticism against her saying reports that "depict me as a young Muslim who supports Isis" are "simply not true".  She says she is "deeply concerned at accusations of anti-Semitism" - something she denies. The Daily Mail reports on student unions planning to cut ties with the NUS over Ms Bouattia's election, headed by Exeter University. The Huffington Post reports that NUS could face a financial crisis if threats to disaffiliate from it are carried out.

The Guardian

The Times

Daily Mail

Huffington Post

 

WHITE PAPER TO PAVE THE WAY FOR CHEAP DEGREES FROM PRIVATE PROVIDERS

COMPANIES such as Apple, Google and the education publisher Pearson will be allowed to award cut-price degrees to British students under proposals to be announced in a white paper next month.

Sunday Times

 

MOOCS REPORT AN INCREASE IN INTEREST

MOOC provider Coursera says there has been a 50% increase in new registrations on its platform over the past year, driven by an interest in "flexible, career-relevant education among adults in the UK".

University Business

 

HAVING A SAY ON THE EU REFERENDUM

University Business asks several higher education figures from the UK what they believe a "Brexit" would mean for universities.

University Business 

 

Saturday April 23

 

UNEASE OVER CHOICE OF NUS PRESIDENT GROWING

A campaign by students at some universities to break ties with the National Union of Students over the election of a new, controversial president is growing, according to The Telegraph.  Exeter University students' union is to vote on disaffiliating and there are calls for a vote at Newcastle University, the paper says. The Times reports on the background of the new president, Malia Bouattia. Jack Grove, writing in THE, asks if the NUS has become too politically correct, prompted by officials asking Ms Bouattia's supporters not to clap when she won the vote, in case the noise upset others.  

Telegraph

Times

THE

 

MORE THAN 90,000 STUDENT VISAS CURTAILED IN THREE YEARS

About 30,000 overseas students a year have had their visas for the UK curtailed in the past three years. Freedom of Information data released to the BBC also shows that 410 educational establishments had their licences to sponsor international students taken away in the same period.

BBC

 

BIS CUTS 'WOULD HIT RESEARCH COUNCILS AND OFFA'

Times Higher Education reports on a leaked document which suggests cuts to the UK research councils could mean a 17 per cent reduction in staff numbers. OFFA would also take a big hit under proposals from BiS for savings by 2020.  

THE

 

ACADEMIC MINISTERS BOOST RESEARCH PERFORMANCE

Times Higher Education reports that countries which have ministers in charge of higher education who have a background as academics or former university leaders boost research output.

THE

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE DOMINANT IN ACADEMIA

The English language has taken over academia, according to The Conversation. In universities in countries where English is not the official language, English is increasingly used in teaching, it says, and is often the  language academics want their research published in.

The Conversation

 

WHAT ARE UNIVERSITIES DOING TO DEAL WITH SEXUAL VIOLENCE?

Universities UK has a blog from Professor Graham Towl about how universities are tackling the problem of sexual violence. He gave a talk on the issue at the organisation's conference last week and writes that "the key message from the day was about the importance of us as university communities talking about the problems of sexual violence and then taking actions".

Universities UK

 

ACTION NEEDED TO PROMOTE GENDER EQUALITY

The Vice Chancellor of Liverpool University, Janet Beer, says urgent action is needed to improve the gender balance at senior levels in universities.

THE

 

REASONS TO STAY IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

Writing in University Business, Angus Laing, Dean at Lancaster University Management School, says a vote for the UK to leave the European Union would have "far-reaching implications for the UK". Universities and business schools have big concerns over "future European funding and the potential loss of significant numbers of EU students", he says.

University Business

 

Friday April 22

 

BUCKINGHAM PLANS LEADERSHIP COLLEGE TO FAST TRACK GRADUATES INTO HEADSHIPS

The University of Buckingham is planning to launch a school leadership college that could train graduates to become headteachers after just two years of training.

Telegraph

 

NUS BRACED FOR ATTACKS OVER CONTROVERSIAL PRESIDENT ELECTION

The National Union of Students says it is braced for political attacks after its members elected the controversial left-wing candidate Malia Bouattia as NUS president.  In a Guardian blog, Hannah Weisfeld, founder and director of the Anglo-Jewish group Yachad, argues it is Ms Bouattia's anti-Zionist stance that has caused furore.

THE

Guardian

 

OVERSEAS STUDENTS GAIN LESS THAN UK PEERS FROM WORK PLACEMENTS

International students benefit from work placements in their final year, but not nearly as much as their UK peers, a study has concluded.

THE

 

CASUAL UNIVERSITY STAFF HAVE NO VOICE

A contributor to the Guardian's Academics Anonymous column complains that casual staff are forced to stay silent over issues they would raise as a permanent member of staff.

Guardian

 

BURSARY LOSS ALREADY HITTING NURSING RECRUITMENT, INSTITUTE CHIEF WARNS

Parents are already advising their children not to study nursing as a result of the government’s plans to axe bursaries for nursing students and replace them with loans, according to Dr Crystal Oldman, chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute.

Nursing Times

 

GLASGOW SCHOOL OF ART PLANS £32M CITY CENTRE CAMPUS EXTENSION

Glasgow School of Art has announced plans for a major expansion of its city centre campus. A £20m fundraising drive to restore the Mackintosh building, damaged by fire in 2014, has raised £17m. That target will now be increased to £32m to cover the restoration and campus expansion.

BBC

 

NEW HE FOUNDATION WILL FUND UNIVERSITIES TO TACKLE KEY ISSUES

University Partnerships Programme, one of the UK's largest student accommodation providers, has launched the UPP Foundation, a charitable body that will award £2.5 million over the next five years to universities and other sector bodies to help tackle key issues such as student retention. The foundation has an advisory board that includes David Laws, former chief secretary to the Treasury, and Vice-Chancellors such as Sir David Greenaway, Mary Stuart and Sir Steve Smith, from the universities of Nottingham, Lincoln and Exeter. One of its first acts will be to fund Student Minds’ Student Living project, working in collaboration with Nottingham Trent University, which will develop front-line staff training to deal with mental health issues.

THE

UPP

 

INTO-UEA WINS QUEEN'S AWARD

INTO-UEA, a joint partnership between INTO University Partnerships and University of East Anglia, has won the Queen's Award for Enterprise honoured for its decade-long partnership which has generated approximately £60m in “additional annual revenues” for the university and local community.

PIE News

 

STUDENT UNIONS THREATEN TO LEAVE NUS OVER ELECTION OF CONTROVERSIAL PRESIDENT

Student unions at leading universities including Oxford and Cambridge are threatening to disaffiliate from the National Union of Students after it elected a new President who faces accusations of anti-Semitism, and who once blocked a motion condemning Isis. The Huffington Post reports that Exeter students are among those threatening to leave NUS.

The Times

Telegraph

Guardian

Daily Mail

Huffington Post

 

 

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