If you are a registered HEi-know user, please log in to continue.

Unregistered Visitors

You must be a registered HEi-know user to access Briefing Reports, stories and other information and services. Please click on the link below to find out more about HEi-know.

Find out more
HE Commission seeks evidence on inquiry into UK HE exports

Universities have been invited to submit evidence to the Higher Education Commission's sixth cross-party inquiry, examining the export potential for the UK’s higher education sector.

Higher education under the microscope

As higher education faces an unprecedented period of scrutiny and change, Claire Lorrain, Chair of the Association of Managers in Higher Education (AMHEC), looks at key issues to be explored at AMHEC’S annual conference in April.

HEi News Roundup live

Live higher education news roundup

Half of students think feminism is "too radical", survey finds

Over half of students feel the feminism movement is too radical, according to a survey conducted by The Student Room.

HEi-think: Celebrating and supporting women in HE

As we celebrate International Women’s Day , Professor Yvonne Barnett, Pro Vice-Chancellor Research at Nottingham Trent University and Professor Shearer West, Vice-Chancellor of University of Nottingham, look at what universities need to do to support female academics and how the two institutions are working together to do just that.

Good Practice Briefing: Responding to the student mental health crisis

Universities are responding to a growing student mental health crisis highlighted in a number of recent reports. On University Mental Health Day , HEi-know examines the context and looks at some examples of good practice across the sector.

Universities must involve students in governance under new OfS regulatory regime

A new regulatory framework for higher education launched by the Office for Students places a new requirement on universities to “engage with the student voice”.

HEi-think: Tertiary review must untangle some knotty problems facing HE

The review of post-18 education launched by the Prime Minister faces some knotty problems to untangle over higher education funding and student finance, but in itself adds another thread to the tapestry of changes woven around the sector, says Diana Beech, Director of Policy and Advocacy for the Higher Education Policy Institute.

Germany and Malaysia top new global HE index

Germany and Malaysia are the two countries best positioned to benefit from continuing growth in global higher education, a study has concluded.

Both are slightly ahead of the UK and Australia in the level of support they provide for international HE through policies, regulations, quality assurance, and finance, according to a new British Council index that compares 26 countries around the world.

The United States trails behind these and China, Vietnam, Indonesia and Thailand, according to the index.

The findings are contained in a report The Shape of Global Higher Education launched at Going Global, the British Council’s annual conference, being held in Africa for the first time.

Intended as a guide for policy-makers, leaders and education professionals, the study identifies the national environments most conducive for international collaboration, research, partnerships and future economic growth. The British Council described it as “the first comparative framework through which the relative strengths and weaknesses of different countries’ higher education policies can be judged”.

The 26 nations, including the UK, USA, Brazil, China, India and Russia, were each measured against 37 qualitative indicators. As part of research to develop the indicators, more than 100 pieces of legislation and national strategies were reviewed and evaluated.

The study identifies three key areas where national governments can support international higher education: openness – enabling mobility of students, researchers and academic programmes; a regulatory environment that helps mobility and programmes through quality assurance and recognition of international qualifications; and equitable access and sustainable development policies.

Australia, the UK and Germany come out top for openness and international mobility, although the UK’s main strengths in this area are drawn from international strategy and transnational education, masking “an incomplete set of policies regarding students and academic mobility”, the report says. The same three countries score highest on quality assurance and degree recognition, but the UK falls to ninth place on equitable access, which considers factors such as brain drain and displacement of students from disadvantaged and vulnerable backgrounds by international students. On this third measure, China tops the table followed by Germany and Thailand.

Bringing all three of these broad areas together, Germany and Malaysia have the highest overall scores. The report cites Malaysia’s Education Blueprint 2015-2020, which contains ambitions targets for international student recruitment and research collaborations; and Germany’s Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdeinst’s Strategy 2020, which focusses on student mobility, as examples of increasing commitment towards supporting international HE.

The study found that student mobility is one of the best developed areas of national-level policies. The majority of the countries studied have introduced student-friendly and welcoming visa policies, though a much smaller number (Australia, Germany and more recently Russia) have widened access to their labour market for international students. Quality assurance emerged as the weakest area.

To allow users to analyse the study’s data for themselves, the British Council has also produced the Global Gauge - an interactive tool designed for policy-makers which can isolate specific measures within the data, giving users the opportunity to explore the relative strengths of individual national systems.

Professor Jo Beall, Director Education and Society, British Council, says:  “There is hardly a country left unaffected by the global flows of students, teaching and research, so the value of a greater understanding of national higher education systems has never been more important. The future of higher education will depend on successful, sustainable, mutually beneficial partnerships.”

 Janet Ilieva, Director, Education Insight, and report author, says: “To be relevant and active in higher education, UK institutions need to be internationally engaged – not just in terms of recruiting international students, but through collaborating with foreign partners in teaching and research projects.”


Follow Going Global news and events on Twitter @HEGoingGlobal #GoingGlobal2016