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HEi-think: Graduate employers will be disappointed by Migration Committee report

Stephen Isherwood, Chief Executive at the Institute of Student Employers, responds to the publication of the Migration Advisory Committee report on the impacts of international students in the UK.

Part-time degree is worth up to £377k, study suggests

Completing a part-time degree in your late 30s is associated with an increase in lifetime earnings of up to £377,000 in cash terms, a new study commissioned by the Open University shows.

HEi-think: Why overseas students deserve a more welcoming UK visa policy

Following encouraging comments from universities minister Sam Gyimah on Universities UK's call for the re-introduction of a post-study work visa, Professor Sir Keith Burnett, the outgoing President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Sheffield who co-founded the #WeAreInternational campaign with the President of the Sheffield Students' Union in 2012, argues that now is the time for the government to back up its welcoming words for international students with a welcoming policy change.

HEi-think: UUK annual conference -- thoughts from HE leaders

University UK's annual conference, held at Sheffield Hallam University, kicked off the academic year with speeches and debates on a wide range of burning issues, including Brexit, fees and funding, overseas students, public perceptions of HE, value for money, freedom of speech, and student mental health. HEi-know asked Higher Education Policy Institute Director Nick Hillman, Staffordshire University Vice-Chancellor Professor Liz Barnes, and Lancaster University Vice-Chancellor Professor Mark Smith, to give their personal perspectives on the event and its themes.

A third of university applicants regret A level choices, survey finds

Nearly a third of university applicants wish they had chosen different A level subjects, according to research from Which? University.

A survey of over 1,000 students conducted by Youthsight for Which? also found that four in ten wished they had thought more about what subjects might help them get into university.

Only around half (53 per cent) of the UK university applicants surveyed felt suitably informed about how their A-levels could affect their choice of university or course. Almost a third (30 per cent) said that the information and advice they received on which A-levels to take, failed to take into account how it may affect their degree and university choices.

A-levels can have a big impact on university applications, with some courses requiring specific subjects, and some universities not accepting certain disciplines. But less than half (41 per cent) of those we surveyed were aware that many universities have a list of A-level subjects they view less favourably.

Of those applying to university, a fifth (18 per cent) said different A-level subjects would have been better suited to the degree they were applying for.

To help students make better more informed choices, Which? University’s has launched a new A-level Explorer tool.

Alex Neill at Which? University, said: “Students know that choosing what to study at university is an important decision. However, our research shows that they are less clear about how earlier decisions could impact on the degree options available to them.

“While certain A-levels might suggest a particular degree path, our tool shows there are usually alternative options students can take. It’s important that students choose their A-levels with both degree courses and future careers in mind.”

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