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Continued uncertainty is a certainty for universities

Uncertainty was the dominant theme in last week's HE news, and it looks like the sector can expect more of the same into the New Year, says Ross Renton, Pro Vice-Chancellor for students at the University of Worcester, in the third of our weekly HE news reviews.

Scottish budget brings real terms cuts for universities

Universities leaders in Scotland have criticised a real terms budget cut for higher education.

More women fill top posts in UK HE - but turnover remains high

More women are rising to top posts in UK universities, but turbulence in the sector means turnover remains high among HE leaders, a new HEi-know survey has found.

HEi-know Weekly HE News Review: Diversity matters

Mike Ratcliffe, Academic Registrar at Nottingham Trent University, reviews HE sector news in a week when T levels, educational “snobbery”, Oxbridge admissions, and a new universities minister made the headlines.

2 minute briefing: School pupils' university aspirations

The proportion of school pupils who are planning to go to university has risen over the past 13 years, but half of them today worry about the cost of higher education, a poll by the Sutton Trust has found. HEi-know provides a two minute summary of the survey's key findings.

 

  • The proportion of 11 – 16 year olds in academies and maintained schools in England and Wales who say they are likely to go into higher education has risen from 71 per cent in 2003 to 77 per cent in 2016.

  • The proportion who say they are unlikely to go to university has fallen in the same period from 13 per cent to 11 per cent.

  • Of those that say today they are unlikely to enter HE, 68 per cent said it was because they "don't like this kind of learning", 62 per cent said it was because they were worried about the cost, 43 per cent because they "need a job", and 44 per cent because they are "not clever enough" (up from 37 per cent in 2015).

  • A further 31 per cent cited social reasons for not going to university, while 21 per cent said they didn't know enough about it.

  • Of those who are planning to go to university, 47 per cent said they were worried about the cost, while 46 per cent said cost didn't worry them.

  • Tuition fees was the biggest financial concern for prospective students, cited by 45 per cent. Nearly a fifth (19 per cent) were worried about student loan repayments, while 17 per cent were concerned about living costs.
leaf / 123RF
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