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Conceptions of what is excellent in higher education are starting to change

Professor Edward Peck, Vice-Chancellor of Nottingham Trent University, outlines strategies adopted by NTU that are boosting social mobility and which helped it win the inaugural Guardian University of the Year award, a gong he believes shows how notions of excellence in HE are changing.

A house divided? Growing divisions and inequalities in HE

Mike Boxall, who has thirty years' experience as a consultant and commentator on strategic developments in higher and further education, finds evidence in recent news of growing and worrying divisions within UK higher education.

UK HE must put its house in order to maintain global excellence

News on higher education over the past week highlights an urgent need for the sector to get to grips with ethical issues that have a bearing on the way it is managed and governed, argues Sandra Booth, Director of Policy and External Relations at Council for Higher Education in Art and Design (CHEAD).

Rising staff costs putting universities under greater pressure, warns Moody's

UK universities will face greater financial pressure over the next three years due to rising staff costs as they accommodate more students, retain talent and negotiate pay rises,  Moody's has warned.

2 minute briefing: School pupils' university aspirations

The proportion of school pupils who are planning to go to university has risen over the past 13 years, but half of them today worry about the cost of higher education, a poll by the Sutton Trust has found. HEi-know provides a two minute summary of the survey's key findings.

 

  • The proportion of 11 – 16 year olds in academies and maintained schools in England and Wales who say they are likely to go into higher education has risen from 71 per cent in 2003 to 77 per cent in 2016.

  • The proportion who say they are unlikely to go to university has fallen in the same period from 13 per cent to 11 per cent.

  • Of those that say today they are unlikely to enter HE, 68 per cent said it was because they "don't like this kind of learning", 62 per cent said it was because they were worried about the cost, 43 per cent because they "need a job", and 44 per cent because they are "not clever enough" (up from 37 per cent in 2015).

  • A further 31 per cent cited social reasons for not going to university, while 21 per cent said they didn't know enough about it.

  • Of those who are planning to go to university, 47 per cent said they were worried about the cost, while 46 per cent said cost didn't worry them.

  • Tuition fees was the biggest financial concern for prospective students, cited by 45 per cent. Nearly a fifth (19 per cent) were worried about student loan repayments, while 17 per cent were concerned about living costs.
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